Butler University

This post is part of the APUSH Gameday series.


Butler University  “Education, Research, Service” 

On January 15, 1850, the Indiana State legislature adopted Ovid Butler’s proposed charter for a new Christian university in Indianapolis. After five years in development, Butler University opened on November 1, 1855, as North Western Christian University at 13th Street and College Avenue on Indianapolis’ near north side at the eastern edge of the present Old Northside Historic District. Attorney and university founder Ovid Butler provided the property.

In Indianapolis, Ovid established a law firm with partners Calvin Fletcher, Simon Yandes and future Indianapolis mayor, Horatio C. Newcomb. Butler became interested and active in political and social issues. In 1849, Butler established the political and abolitionist newspaper Free Soil Banner. Due to bad health, Butler gave up his law practice in 1849, seeking retirement.

Curriculum Connections:   Sectional Issues, Founder Ovid Butler, Abolition

 

 

University of Wisconsin  

This post is part of the APUSH Gameday series.

University of Wisconsin  “Numen Lumen”   (The divine within the universe, however manifested, is my light)

The University of Wisconsin–was founded when Wisconsin achieved statehood in 1848, UW–Madison is the official state university of Wisconsin, and the flagship campus of the University of Wisconsin System. It was the first public university established in Wisconsin and remains the oldest and largest public university in the state. It became a land-grant institution in 1866

Miners who moved to the area in the 1820s and 1830s wasted little time in constructing shelters. Without shelter in the winter, they had to “live like badgers” in tunnels burrowed into hillsides, earning miners the nickname “badgers.” The tools and techniques involved in lead mining in these early years were relatively simple and inexpensive, allowing lucky miners to strike it rich with little personal expense.

University of Wisconsin Professor Frederick Jackson Turner

Vietnam War era at University of Wisconsin: 50 years ago, ‘Dow Day’ left its mark on Madison

 

 

 

Nativism in 3D

Know Nothing

Antebellum Immigration “Nativism in 3D”
Distrust, Discrimination and Destruction

Were the Irish and German immigrants welcomed in Antebellum America?  (Not really and not always).

Anti-Irish sentiment may refer to or include racism, oppression, bigotry, persecution, discrimination, hatred or fear of Irish people as an ethnic group or nation, whether directed against Ireland in general or against Irish emigrants and their descendants in the Irish diaspora.

An Anti-Immigrant movement develops. What began as the secret society – “Order of the Star Spangled Banner,” evolves into a political party  – The American Party (AKA the Know – Nothing Party)

Distrust – Immigration causes anxiety and social disorder – All immigrants did was drink and steal.

Discrimination – The issue of anti-Irish job discrimination in the United States. Some insist that the “No Irish need apply” signs were common.

Destruction – In Louisville, Kentucky, election-day rioters killed at least 22 people in attacks on German and Irish Catholics on Aug. 6, 1855, in what became known as “Bloody Monday.” In Philadelphia in 1844, for example, a series of nativist assaults on Catholic churches and community centers resulted in the loss of lives and the professionalization of the police force.